1. moxiearien:

    cresentmoon2000:

    katiaobinger:

    the true american experience is wondering if you just heard firecrackers or gunshots

    PLEASE TELL ME THIS IS A JOKE

    bonus points: both are illegal in your state and you still cannot tell

    Not a joke.

    Reblogged from: aconnormanning
  2. faineemae:

    In response to Pamela Geller’s Islamophobic Anti-Jihad Bus Ads

    MyJihad is a public education campaign that seeks to share the proper meaning of Jihad as believed and practiced by the majority of Muslims. Jihad means “struggling in the way of God”. The way of God, being goodness, justice, passion, compassion, etc. It is putting up the good fight against whatever odds or barriers you face in your life.

    It is a central tenet of the Islamic creed that has unfortunately been widely misrepresented due to a) first and foremost, the actions of Muslim extremists, b) attempts at public indoctrination by Islamophobes who claim that the extremists are right and the rest of us are wrong, and c) a selective media that understandably focuses on the sensational.

    This campaign is about reclaiming our faith and its concepts from extremists, both Muslim and anti-Muslim. It’s about our voice, our lives, our reality. MyJihad includes displaying public ads on buses & trains, the use of #MyJihad hashtag on twitter, outreach on Facebook and Youtube, as well as speaking events and other initiatives. 

    Read more

    Reblogged from: parafictional
  3. downto142:

frettedtoflame:

renrevenge:



I’M FUCKING SCREAMING OMGGGGGG THE TIME HAS COME FOR THE 90S TO ROMANTICIZED BY NON-90S KIDS FUCK

I feel like a legend.

I had no idea I was living in a golden age!

    downto142:

    frettedtoflame:

    renrevenge:

    I’M FUCKING SCREAMING OMGGGGGG THE TIME HAS COME FOR THE 90S TO ROMANTICIZED BY NON-90S KIDS FUCK

    I feel like a legend.

    I had no idea I was living in a golden age!

    Reblogged from: jennsaysrawr
  4. Reblogged from: story-dj
  5. semiticsemantics:

b1a4gasms:

all-about-male-privilege:

animalsandtrees:

"When Cynthia Koenig, a young social entrepreneur from New York, learned that millions of girls and women around the world spend hours each day collecting water from distant sources, she decided to create a new way to help people in poor communities transport water and it’s called the WaterWheel. Koenig’s WaterWheel allows people to roll water in a 50-liter container versus carrying it in 5 gallon (19 liter) jugs. Koenig estimates that the WaterWheel can save women 35 hours per week in water transport time, as well as prevent the physical strain that comes from balancing 40 pounds of water on top of their heads for hours each day. Every day around the world, over 200 million hours are spent each day fetching water, often from water sources miles from home, and this task usually falls to women and girls. By freeing up valuable time, the WaterWheel allows women to spend time on income-generating activities that can help pull her family out of poverty. The time savings also means that there is a greater likelihood that girls will be allowed to stay in school, further reducing the rate of intergenerational poverty. After receiving a $100,000 Grand Challenges Canada prize to develop the WaterWheel, Koenig founded a social enterprise company, Wello. The company is in an early stage of development and has been piloting the WaterWheel in rural communities in India. Koenig also plans on continuing to make the WaterWheel itself more useful by adding in filtration, drip irrigation kits, even a cell phone charger that uses the rotation of the wheel to charge the battery of the cell phone and give people more access to essentials like communication and education. To learn more about this invention and its potential to transform the lives of many girls and women around the world, check out Koenig’s TED talk and you can read a recent article in The Guardian about her venture. To learn more about how to support her work, visit Wello’s website.”For a wonderful book about more female innovators and inventors throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious Inventions by Women” for readers 8 to 13.To help children and teens better understand the challenges many children around the world face in order to go to school, check out the blog post, “Honoring Malala: Mighty Girl Books on Children’s Fight for Education,” showcasing our top books for young readers on children’s educational access issues.A Mighty Girl also has a section highlighting stories that feature poverty and hardship as a significant theme. Such stories provide opportunities for parents to discuss these topics with their children while also helping to foster children’s empathy for people living in difficult circumstances. Learn more here.”

In tales of badass women today…

just donated. if you have any available cash, consider doing the same.

This thing is utterly brilliant.

    semiticsemantics:

    b1a4gasms:

    all-about-male-privilege:

    animalsandtrees:

    "When Cynthia Koenig, a young social entrepreneur from New York, learned that millions of girls and women around the world spend hours each day collecting water from distant sources, she decided to create a new way to help people in poor communities transport water and it’s called the WaterWheel. Koenig’s WaterWheel allows people to roll water in a 50-liter container versus carrying it in 5 gallon (19 liter) jugs. Koenig estimates that the WaterWheel can save women 35 hours per week in water transport time, as well as prevent the physical strain that comes from balancing 40 pounds of water on top of their heads for hours each day. 

    Every day around the world, over 200 million hours are spent each day fetching water, often from water sources miles from home, and this task usually falls to women and girls. By freeing up valuable time, the WaterWheel allows women to spend time on income-generating activities that can help pull her family out of poverty. The time savings also means that there is a greater likelihood that girls will be allowed to stay in school, further reducing the rate of intergenerational poverty. 

    After receiving a $100,000 Grand Challenges Canada prize to develop the WaterWheel, Koenig founded a social enterprise company, Wello. The company is in an early stage of development and has been piloting the WaterWheel in rural communities in India. Koenig also plans on continuing to make the WaterWheel itself more useful by adding in filtration, drip irrigation kits, even a cell phone charger that uses the rotation of the wheel to charge the battery of the cell phone and give people more access to essentials like communication and education. 

    To learn more about this invention and its potential to transform the lives of many girls and women around the world, check out Koenig’s TED talk and you can read a recent article in The Guardian about her venture. To learn more about how to support her work, visit Wello’s website.”

    For a wonderful book about more female innovators and inventors throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious Inventions by Women” for readers 8 to 13.

    To help children and teens better understand the challenges many children around the world face in order to go to school, check out the blog post, “Honoring Malala: Mighty Girl Books on Children’s Fight for Education,” showcasing our top books for young readers on children’s educational access issues.

    A Mighty Girl also has a section highlighting stories that feature poverty and hardship as a significant theme. Such stories provide opportunities for parents to discuss these topics with their children while also helping to foster children’s empathy for people living in difficult circumstances. Learn more here.”

    In tales of badass women today…

    just donated. if you have any available cash, consider doing the same.

    This thing is utterly brilliant.

    Reblogged from: catwytch
  6. whiletheflies:

What the fuck

I’m sorry, what? Is Tesco a wonderland?

    whiletheflies:

    What the fuck

    I’m sorry, what? Is Tesco a wonderland?

    Reblogged from: whiletheflies
  7. Reblogged from: catwytch
  8. Reblogged from: story-dj
  9. Reblogged from: story-dj
  10. danieljlayton:

    anomaly1:

    black--lamb:

    i had a relaxer up until i was 20 lol (my mom was a beautician and straightened it when i was 5)

    i cut it into a bob in highschool

    image

    image

    then i rebelled (and wore way too much makeup):

    image

    then came the bowl cut in college…fml:

    image

    then the try to look like a sorority girl look:

    image

    then did this mohawk…thing to it in the summer and dyed it red (my eyebrows were also on the battlefield)

    image

    then i cut that shit off

    image

    no more relaxers

    image

    and in the last year….

    image

    image

    (protective style…damn i wore that sweater a lot..)

    image

    image

    image

    image

    image

    image

    image

    image

    image

    image

    image

    image

    image

    (i skipped a few styles, but you get the gist) 

    This post is like watching a flower bloom

    There isn’t one haircut here I don’t like.

    I’m quite fond of the Mohawk. That shit fierce.

    Love it all. 

    Reblogged from: danieljlayton
  11. Reblogged from: jackhoward
  12. Reblogged from: ketocami
  13. dont-see:

saepphire:

❁

I love it.

    dont-see:

    saepphire:

    I love it.

    Reblogged from: catwytch
  14. oh hell.

    oh hell.

    Reblogged from: healthyamanda991
  15. alexithymiadaily:

Secret from PostSecret.com

Cultivate health and save money. Everything else, whatever happens, is easier to deal with when you’re healthy and have a nest egg. 

    alexithymiadaily:

    Secret from PostSecret.com

    Cultivate health and save money. Everything else, whatever happens, is easier to deal with when you’re healthy and have a nest egg. 

    Reblogged from: rissachangedforthebetter
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